Couples and Money: Truth or Friction?

Money is one of the most sensitive topics couples face. Disagreement over spending and saving habits is one of the most frequent causes of friction in a relationship. Truthful, frank discussion and mutual financial planning can go a long way to resolve the tension.

BUDGET: A DIRTY WORD?
Does the mere mention of a budget start your teeth grinding? For many, it evokes the same enthusiasm as going on a diet – in this case, a money diet. Begin by changing your focus. Agree with your partner to create a spending plan. Agree to review it and adjust it periodically. A plan is adjustable and should suit your lifestyle, not imprison you.

The first step is to carefully track expenses. Save every receipt for a month so you have a clear picture of your spending. Be open about your spending. In a relationship, silence is not golden.

SET SAVINGS GOALS
“Pay yourself first” is the first rule of financial success. Agree to commit a percentage of your take-home pay to savings. Ten percent is a good place to start. Increase the amount as you can. Maximize contributions to retirement or 401(k) plans where an employer provides matching funds.

Need a retirement plan? Check out these savings options that are customized to your needs.

DISCUSS BIG EXPENDITURES
Agree to consult with each other about purchases that are more than a specific amount (such as $200). Keep an agreed-upon amount of cash of your own in an individual account. Each of you should have money to spend on small indulgences with no questions asked. Agree in advance on what types of expenses are personal. For example, is a magazine subscription personal or part of your overall spending plan? Deciding in advance will leave little room for argument later.

Thinking about making a large purchase? Ask yourself these questions first.

Additionally, don’t criticize each other in public about money. Keep financial discussions private. Review your plan periodically. Every year or so, sit down to determine if your goals have changed or if your plan needs adjusting. You’ll avoid the type of arguments most couples find themselves in by keeping these simple guidelines in mind.

Feeling overwhelmed? Consider sitting down with one of our free, on-staff financial counselors for a fresh perspective.

Seven Steps to a Mid-Year Financial Check-Up

It feels like you just packed away the holiday decorations yesterday, but believe it or not, 2019 is already half over. As we sail into the season of barbecues and beaches, take a few minutes to give yourself a mid-year financial checkup. A small investment of time can spur important changes that can affect your financial wellness for the rest of 2019 or even for years to come. 

Use the seven steps detailed below to guide you through your checkup. 

Step 1: Revisit Your Budget 
Remember sitting down in December and crunching all those numbers? There’s no need for such a detailed job again, but take some time to review your monthly budget. Are you sticking to the planned budget for every category? Are you overspending in some categories or under-spending in others? Do you need to adjust your allotted budget in some areas or maybe trim your discretionary spending across the board?

Review your spending over the last few months and make any necessary changes so your budget can continue working for you. Be sure to account for any significant life changes that may alter your financial needs, such as a marriage, the birth of a child, a divorce, or a job change. 

 You will avoid falling into a mindless spending trap and you will be taking proactive steps toward staying on top of your finances for the rest of 2019 by reviewing and adjusting your budget.

Step 2: Anticipate Large Expenses 
Now that you’ve updated your monthly budget, take a moment to list any large expenses you anticipate having in the next six months. This can include household appliances that may need replacing, expensive car repairs that will likely become necessary, or an anticipated medical expense that is not fully covered by insurance. 

Once you have this information in hand, determine which spending category you will take the money from to cover these expenses. Do you have a rainy-day fund that can pay for one or several of these costs? Can you use the money in your emergency fund? Make the decision about sourcing this money now so you don’t make the wrong choices when you’re stressed and pressed for time in the future. 

If you do not have enough money set aside for these expenses, build a savings plan into your monthly budget now so you have the funds available when you need them. 

Step 3: Review Your Tax Withholdings 
Review your tax withholdings to see if they need any adjusting. If taxes and numbers are not your thing, ask your accountant for assistance with this step. Your goal here is to pay the perfect amount so you’re not hit with a huge tax bill at the end of the year but also not lending the government your money interest-free. 

Step 4: Check Your Credit Score 
Your credit score is like your money grade, indicating the degree of your financial wellness and responsibility. Visit AnnualCreditReport.com for your free credit report from any of the three major credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. 

If your score has gone up in the last six months, you’re doing great! Keep up the good work. 

On the flip side, if your score has dropped, review your report in detail. Are there any errors you’ll need to contest with the Federal Trade Commission? Is there a credit card bill or another line of credit you’ve been neglecting that is dragging your score down? Are you having trouble remembering to pay your monthly bills in a timely manner? Take the necessary steps to fix your score today by setting up an automatic payment on some of your bills, by lowering your credit utilization rate by paying with plastic less often, or by sitting down with one of our free financial counselors.

Step 5: Review Your Investments
Now is the time to review and adjust all of your investments. This includes your contributions to your retirement funds or savings certificates at DoverPhila Federal Credit Union. Make sure you are maximizing your contributions when possible and that your other investments are performing according to plan, adjusting as necessary.   

Step 6: Tackle Your Debt 
List every single outstanding debt you carry, including credit card debt and loans. Designate one debt to tackle first, either choosing the one that carries the highest interest rate or the one with the lowest balance. Next, work on a plan to get rid of your chosen debt, being careful not to neglect the others. See if you can trim your budget or boost your income in any way to increase your payments on this debt. Once you’ve paid it off, move to the next one on your list so you’re on your way to a debt-free life. 

Step 7: Review Your Financial Resolutions and Long-term Goals 
Which financial resolutions did you jot down at the end of 2018? What are your dreams for the future? Did you want to start socking away another $200 a month? Is your goal to retire comfortably at 55?

Take some time to review these goals and to determine whether you are indeed taking the steps necessary for making them happen. If you’ve been neglecting them for the first half of 2019, create a plan for working toward them for the rest of the year. Remember: With determination and proper planning, nearly any financial goal is possible! 

Now that you’ve given yourself a thorough financial checkup, you can kick back and enjoy the sweetness and the sunshine of the season, guilt-free. Click here for more tips and tools to help maneuver your finances in the right direction.

The Credit Union Difference Part 2: What’s in a Membership?

As a member of DoverPhila Federal Credit Union, you are uniquely positioned to manage your finances and watch your money grow on the best possible terms. Like the member of an elite club, you are entitled to exclusive privileges and individualized service, courtesy of your credit union. Let’s take a quick look at some of the benefits you can enjoy as a member of DoverPhila. 

Highly personalized service 
Credit unions are well known for the highly personalized and attentive service they provide to members. A 2017 American Customer Satisfaction Index Finance and Insurance Report found that members rate credit unions with better service than banks, scoring an average of 82 out of 100. It’s part of what makes credit unions unique. 

When you step through the door of DoverPhila Federal Credit Union, you know you’ll always be welcomed by familiar faces, warm smiles and friendly greetings. There are no aloof tellers who don’t know you or your financial situation—just our helpful service representatives who treat you like family. No matter your age or stage, our staff is happy to guide you through any monetary challenge and assist you in reaching your financial goals. 

At the credit union, our outstanding member service means we’re personally invested in your financial well-being and only want to see your success. To that end, we’ll grant you a loan quicker than most big banks. We also partner with area organizations to host financial literacy programs for our members and the larger community throughout the year, enabling you to broaden your money knowledge and to learn how to make smarter financial choices. 

Increased value for your money 
As a not-for-profit cooperative, your credit union is proud to provide savings to you in the form of low or no account fees, better loan terms, and higher dividend payments on your savings. 

According to a report by the Credit Union National Association (CUNA) that studied credit unions in New York from March of 2017 through March of 2018, credit unions provided average financial benefits that were equivalent to $85 per member and $178 per household. Another 2018 study performed by Bankrate found that 84 percent of the nation’s 50 largest credit unions offered their members checking accounts with no monthly maintenance fee – something members also receive at DoverPhila.

Your credit union doesn’t have to answer to outside investors. This enables us to be more attuned to your needs without worrying about increasing our own worth. Our not-for-profit status frees us to offer you optimal terms on share certificates, savings accounts, and more. It’s more money in your pocket just for being a member of DoverPhila Federal Credit Union.

A voice in how the credit union operates
As mentioned, your credit union does not need to answer to stockholders. Instead, DoverPhila is member-owned, operating with only your best interests in mind. 

As a full-fledged member of DoverPhila Federal Credit Union, you have a voice in how your credit union runs. You are invited to cast your ballot in our annual elections in which we vote on a volunteer board of directors. The board is then charged with oversight of the credit union and forming all official decisions regarding the way the credit union operates. Our board is comprised of members of the credit union, just like you. This means the decisions they make will always be advantageous to our membership and to the general community instead of trying to pander to outside stockholders. We’re all about doing what’s best for our members. 

A chance to give back to the community
We’re strong believers in giving back to the community. We support many community initiatives and organizations, and we are committed to making decisions that benefit the entire community. When you choose DoverPhila, you’re choosing to give back to the community, too. 

As a member of the credit union, you are entitled to enjoy all of these benefits and so much more. Whatever your particular needs are, we’re here to help you manage your finances every step of the way. Call, click, or stop by DoverPhila Federal Credit Union today to learn how to make your membership work for you in the best way possible.

The Credit Union Difference Part 1: The History of Credit Unions

As a member of DoverPhila Federal Credit Union, you know credit unions are always striving to serve their members and community in much as possible. We value each member’s input as an equal owner in the credit union, and we offer flexible loan terms, low-cost accounts, and higher dividends to help members achieve and maintain financial wellness. 

This article is the first in a series celebrating the history, contributions, and benefits of credit unions. 

Both credit unions and banks provide consumers with financial services and products, but there are many distinctions between the two. The primary credit union difference lies at its core; Banks are created to generate profit for owners while credit unions are created to provide members with a place to manage their finances at the best possible terms. 

The goal of putting members first is deeply rooted in the history of the credit union movement. 

The first credit union was established in 1864 by Friedrich Raiffeisen in southern Germany. Raiffeisen proposed that all community members pool resources so individuals in need of loans could easily access the necessary funds. Raiffeisen’s idea was well-received, and the first credit union model was soon established. 

In 1909, the credit union movement reached American shores. With Edward Filene serving as its pioneer, the movement gained momentum and continued to grow. In 1920, Edward hired attorney Roy F. Bergengren to assist him in generating the movement’s expansion. Roy created a more systemized concept for the credit union we know today. 

In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Federal Credit Union Act into law.

Federally chartered credit unions in every state were legally authorized to create a system of not-for-profit cooperatives to promote thrift and sound financial practices. 

 In 1970, the public’s confidence in the credit union model grew stronger as the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund was established. With it, credit union deposits became federally insured much like the FDIC insures bank deposits. 

The credit union movement was growing at its most rapid pace, with credit union assets in America tripling between 1970 and 1979. Then, in 1977, another credit union-friendly regulation was signed into law, empowering credit unions to offer more services and products to members. 

Today, the credit union movement continues to thrive in the path charted by its predecessors and is backed by the “full faith and credit of the United States Government.” These not-for-profit institutions serve their 103 million+ members by always putting their members’ needs first and helping them achieve their personal goals through sound financial practices and targeted advice.   

Here at DoverPhila Federal Credit Union, we’re proud to be a part of the collective institutions dedicated to the credit union mission. At the core of our values is an unwavering commitment to creating mutual benefits for members and the larger community. To that end, we are always here to help our members and enable them to optimize their savings or manage finances as smoothly as possible. Our innovative banking solutions, low fees, and high dividend rates, along with personalized service, helps members achieve and maintain financial wellness no matter the financial goals they have. As a member-owned institution, our only objective is your satisfaction and your success. 

Credit union history is still in the making. Be a part of it by clicking here or stopping by DoverPhila today to learn about our exceptional financial products and to benefit from our highly personalized service. 

Sticking to Financial Resolutions

Ohioans, like most Americans, entered 2019 hoping to better their finances, but many have likely already fallen off track.

In an Ohio Credit Union League 2019 consumer survey, 69 percent said their New Year’s resolution was to get on a budget. That statistic isn’t surprising; many Americans looked critically at their financial situations as they headed into 2019. Statista, a platform providing statistical data on a variety of topics, polled 2,000 people about their New Year’s resolutions in early January. The survey found financial goals were the fourth most-popular New Year’s resolution, falling just behind dieting, exercising, and losing weight. 

Americans had good intentions to get their finances in order in 2019, but that doesn’t mean they’ve necessarily stuck to their new budgets. According to research commissioned by GuideVine, a service that matches people with financial advisers, 70 percent of Americans with a budget struggle to stick to it.

And it’s not likely that making your budget a New Year’s resolution will make keeping with it any easier. According to the Ohio Credit Union League survey, 79 percent of Ohioans make incremental improvements toward keeping their resolutions each year, but fall short of keeping them. Another 14 percent have never kept a New Year’s resolution.

The average American doesn’t fare much better. According to a study of 1,450 Americans by Vitagene, 88.6 percent reported they’d likely keep their resolutions for a year or less. Another 36.6 percent of respondents said they usually keep their resolutions for a month or less, meaning they’d be off track by February.

Although your train may have gone off track, all hope is not lost. Here are some tips to help you attain your resolution of getting down to business, paying off bills, buying a house, opening an IRA for retirement, or getting on a path to better financial stability. 

  • Use a budgeting tool. A successful budget must be recorded somewhere. DoverPhila Federal Credit Union offers Banzai, an award-winning financial literacy program that has user-friendly budgeting tools such as calculators, simulated games, and an interactive library with educational articles. Consider budgeting apps such as EveryDollar and YouNeedABudget if you’re looking for more mobile options.

  • Be realistic about spending and saving. Don’t set goals you can’t realistically achieve with your budget. Trying to spend too little or save too much each month could create frustration, which will increase the likelihood that you will dump your budget altogether. Instead, map out incremental changes you can make that will add up to big financial gains over time.

  • Keep goals in mind. Reminding yourself how you would ultimately like your money to work for you can help with exercising control over impulsive spending habits. Consider making your goals visual if you have a hard time picturing your long-term goals when you are tempted to splurge. Try keeping a picture of your ideal retirement in your wallet or a list of all the reasons you want that new car stuck to the fridge. 

  • Reward yourself. It is important to keep long-term goals in mind, but rewarding yourself for small budgeting wins along the way will keep you feeling positive about your budget. The more positively you feel toward a task, the more likely you are to continue performing it. After you reach certain budgeting goals, treat yourself to a small splurge. You earned it!

  • Seek help. Consider asking for help if you are struggling with sticking to a budget. Sometimes, aid can come in the form of a family member who shares household finances. Other times, however, you may require an expert opinion. DoverPhila Federal Credit Union offers free financial counseling to members and is always happy to aid with budget set-up and maintenance.

DoverPhila Federal Credit Union is here to help you reach your financial resolutions. Call the credit union at 330-364-8874 or visit your local credit union for more information.

Reasons to Not Skip a Home Inspection

Shopping for a new home can be an exciting blur of listings, neighborhood scouting and open houses. There’s so much to consider! You want a house in the perfect neighborhood with that gorgeous kitchen and great yard, all within your budget. And then, it all finally comes together and you think you’ve found your dream home. But don’t go “under contract” just yet! Before you officially become the new owner of the house, learn all you can about its general condition by having a home inspection.

A home inspection can set you back several hundred dollars, but it can easily save you thousands down the line. The inspector carefully examines the entire house and checks its systems, structure, and equipment for functionality and potential problems. Having an inspection contingency in your contract gives you a way to opt out even after you are officially under contract. 

Here are some reasons you don’t want to skip a home inspection: 

  • Find deal-breakers. A house may look fantastic, yet have major issues with wiring, roof, HVAC, plumbing, and more. A quality home inspection gives you the inside scoop. You might want to back out of the deal if the inspection reveals any large problems that may take heavy work or expensive repairs – or ask the seller to fix the problems before the closing date if you like the home too much to back away. Sellers sometimes agree to cover any major repairs or to offer the buyer a credit toward overseeing the repairs themselves. 

  • Safety concerns. An inspection can reveal the presence of harmful substances like radon, carbon monoxide, and mold. Look for these hazards before the home is officially yours. You do not want any unpleasant surprises after it is too late. 

  • Anticipate future costly repairs. A professional inspector can determine the age and condition of the home’s systems and equipment, and then forecast when repair or replacement may be needed. This might not be a big enough deal for you to back out of the contract, but it can help you budget for a major repair several years down the line. Alternatively, you may be able to use it for price negotiation. 

  • Reveal illegal additions. An inspection checks for rooms, garages, and basements that were added or finished without following legal codes or obtaining the proper permits. Having an illegal addition in your home means owning property that does not officially exist. This can get you into trouble with home insurance and property taxes. It can also make it difficult to do more work on these areas in your home. You can ask the seller to obtain the proper permits if a home inspection reveals any illegal additions. This information can be used as a bargaining chip.  

  • Obtain insurance easily. Lots of home insurance companies do not insure a home if it has not undergone a certified inspection because they do not want to take a chance covering a home that is going to need costly repairs in the near future. 

  • Learn how to protect your investment. If possible, arrange to follow the inspector around the home as they complete the job. They are an invaluable source of information to you by providing tips and knowledge on how best to maintain your home, its systems, and its equipment. Knowing how to properly care for your home can save you thousands of dollars over the years. 

  • Negotiate. Most home inspections reveal several problems. You can use them as bargaining chips to renegotiate the purchasing price of the home if these problems are minor enough to keep you interested in buying the house in its present condition.

It’s never a good idea to skip a home inspection no matter how perfect your dream home looks.

Are you in the market for a new home? Click here, stop by DoverPhila Federal Credit Union, or call 330-364-8874 today to ask about the home loan options we have for you.

DoverPhila Partners with Area Organizations to Promote Financial Literacy

OhioMeansJobs Tuscarawas County, United Way of Tuscarawas County, Inc., and DoverPhila Federal Credit Union are partnering to offer a financial literacy workshop for area residents. “Master Your Money – Simple Tips to Improve Cash Flow” will be held Tuesday, December 5th, 10:00AM to 12:00PM at OhioMeansJobs Tuscarawas County at 1260 Monroe Street in New Philadelphia. 

The workshop will offer easy and straightforward methods to reaching financial goals. Topics include tackling expenses, increasing savings and improving credit.

“Many of the customers that we serve struggle with numerous financial difficulties due to lack of employment or other employment related issues. This collaboration with United Way of Tuscarawas County, Inc. and DoverPhila Federal Credit Union is a positive step in helping area residents become financially stable and achieve financial independence,” said JoAnn Breedlove, COO of OhioMeansJobs Centers in Stark and Tuscarawas Counties. 

“This collaboration is a great example of how United Way brings together organizations with common missions and goals,” said Robin Waltz, President of United Way of Tuscarawas County, Inc.

For further details contact OhioMeansJobs Tuscarawas County at 330-364-9777. Pre-registration is suggested but not required.

Do You Know the Credit Union Difference?

Credit unions help consumers reach their financial dreams through its people helping people philosophy. Respondents in a 2017 Consumer Survey don by the Ohio Credit Union League were asked what they found to be the most significant difference between credit unions and other financial institutions. Here were the results:

  • 35% of respondents: lower interest rates on loans
  • 34% of respondents: fewer and lower fees compared to other financial institutions
  • 24% of respondents: credit unions are member-owned, with profits going back to benefit members

Credit unions are known for their service-centric model, and 90 percent of the respondents to the League’s survey rated the service they received from credit unions as “outstanding.” The American Customer Satisfaction Index consistently shows credit unions deliver excellent service to members. The most recent report, on its 100-point scale, ACSI said credit unions received an overall score of 82, up from 81 the previous year.

The World Council of Credit Unions data indicates there are 231.2 million credit union members worldwide who belong to 68,880 credit unions in 109 countries. According to the Credit Union National Association there were 110.6 million members of 5,812 credit unions in the United States as of June 2017.

In Ohio, the state’s 284 credit unions serve 2.9 million members. According to a CUNA’s Member Benefits Index, by choosing a credit union as their financial institution, those members received more than $206 million in direct financial benefits in the past year.

Credit unions serve a common field of membership based on characteristics such as a geographical area, employee groups, or membership in an organization. Every resident of Ohio is eligible to join a credit union, and deposits are protected by the federal government’s National Credit Union Administration insurance or the private American Share Insurance. So, if you’re trying to decide on a financial institution, keep the following in mind:

  • Do your research: Online reviews, consumer surveys, and regulatory agency reports are all good resources to find out how financial institutions treat consumers and how business is conducted. The FDIC (banks) and NCUA (credit unions) each have searchable databases on the size, financial health, and insurance status of the financial institutions they regulate
  • Compare your needs with their strengths: If you primarily conduct your financial transactions online, then you will want an institution that offers online or mobile banking. If ATM fees are an issue, then look for surcharge-free networks or institutions that reimburse you for fees. If you need advice on planning for the future, choose an institution with a strong financial wellness program. If you need a car loan or a mortgage, look for the lowest interest rates on loans
  • Choose to be involved: If you have an account with a credit union, you are both a member and an owner. This process guarantees you a voice and ensures that your credit union is looking out for your best financial interests and not that of a small group of stockholders.

Whether you are looking for your first loan, would like to start a small business, or just want to get rid of debt, a credit union can help. They offer many of the same services as other financial institutions, but are not-for-profit. They treat you like a person, not a dollar sign.

The RAIN Method for Buying a Car

The average cost of a new vehicle today is around $30,000. Whether you desire the shiny, brand-new ride or if you are content with a reliable used car, you still want to get the most for your money. The actual process of finding, researching, financing, and buying a car does not need to be scary or intimidating. In fact there is an effective technique for making the right purchase. It’s called RAIN. RAIN is an acronym for Research, Ask questions, Investigate or Inspect, and Negotiate.

Research
In this step, you use information from publications like Consumer Reports, Kelley Blue Book, and other resources to make sure the vehicle you are looking at is a wise choice and a reliable investment. You also need to use the buyer’s guide to find pricing of the vehicles you are looking at. It is easy to find the sticker or retail price, but your goal should be to find out the wholesale price which is the price the dealership paid minus any rebates, hold-backs, or incentives. The wholesale price is the price you will use to negotiate when the time is right. Also, make sure you research more than one vehicle option. Having interest in numerous car options at various dealerships will provide a larger arena for negotiating a price.

Ask
You should contact the insurance company and find out the rates you can expect with the vehicle you are looking at along with a quote from your insurance agent. There are a lot of costs associated with owning a vehicle and insurance is a major one. You should also ask the dealership for information regarding the average cost of upkeep. This information is critical as you examine the overall costs of the purchase you are going to make.

Investigate or Inspect
If you are considering a brand-new car, you should go to the dealership and investigate it. Be sure the salesperson knows that on this trip you plan to test drive only and that you are not ready to make a deal quite yet. This is your opportunity to get a feel for various car options. As you investigate your potential purchase, think about if each vehicle meets your needs, handles well, and if it will keep you happy in the long run.

If you are in search of a used vehicle, the inspection process is very important. Even if you have limited knowledge of automobiles, everyone can conduct a basic inspection. Check out the exterior and interior of your vehicle options. Make sure you take each car for a test drive so you can see how it handles, how it accelerates, and how it brakes. When your inspection is complete and if you are serious about purchasing one of the vehicles, take it to a certified mechanic for a full-car diagnostic. It may cost you $100, but it gives you a detailed report of the car’s condition along with a list of problem areas and the costs to fix those problems. Also, a full diagnostic will help with your last step of negotiating price. Remember to make sure you have more than one vehicle option – each from a different dealership. This will also help with negotiation.

Negotiate
For many, the negotiation process is intimidating. Everyone wants to get the best deal – including salespeople. A good way to take the pressure off of you is to inform each salesperson that you are interested in more than one vehicle at different dealerships and that the dealer with the best offer will get your business. Take all numbers that each dealership gives you and see which offer is the best.If you are not happy with the offers, share your thoughts on what you consider to be a fair price based on your research. If the dealer says no, move on. 

Purchasing a vehicle is probably going to be the second largest expenditure in your life. Being prepared is key to getting the best deal. Following these steps will help you tremendously. Always remember, DoverPhila Federal Credit Union can provide not only the best financial deal for you, but they can also provide support, guidance, and education. 

Three Things to Know Before Purchasing a New Car

When purchasing a vehicle, there are many things to consider before taking the leap such as the pros and cons to buying new cars versus the pros and cons to buying used cars.

Before purchasing a vehicle, think about what the daily use of the vehicle will be, the amount of trunk space you will need, and how much seating space you should have. Make sure the options you are considering are practical reflections of how you will use the car. You may love the look of a larger vehicle, but do you have a need for that much seating? If you do not need that much space then that particular car may not be right for your daily commute and errands.

After you have considered the personal aspects of which car to purchase, move on to the less subjective parts of the process such as depreciation, cost-to-own, and affordability.

Depreciation
Most cars depreciate at about 15% per year. With new cars, there is about a 20% depreciation rate as soon as you drive off the lot. You should consider this before you decide to buy a new car, especially if you cannot afford a large down payment. Chances are you will be upside down on your car loan almost immediately if you’re financing the entire cost.

Cost-to-own
Consider the true cost to own the car you are considering. There are always costs when owning a vehicle such as insurance, fuel, maintenance, and more. Maintenance costs vary by manufacturer and model. Some manufacturers have better reputations than others when it comes to maintenance. Some new cars come with “free” maintenance plans for the first couple of years or for a certain number of miles.

Affordability
Shop around. Do not guide yourself solely by what the dealership is willing to lend you. People are often blindsided by an attractive low monthly payment that is usually tied to a super-long loan term – do not be fooled. Consider all aspects of financing so the total amount you are going to end up paying for that vehicle when it is all said and done is something that is affordable. That’s what matters.

Before you even step on the lot, visit DoverPhila Federal Credit Union. As a not-for-profit financial cooperative, we offer low loan rates and flexible terms that fit your lifestyle, and we are happy to explain the lending process and answer any questions you may have about loans.